Postdoctoral Training Opportunities

Cures don't just happen. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is committed to the education and training of the next generation of research scientists. St. Jude trainees are able to learn from clinical and basic science investigators who work in close proximity and interact regularly to translate scientific discoveries into improved therapies for children.


If you are a highly motivated individual who wants to work at a world-class institution with state of the art facilities and learn from investigators at the forefront of their fields, consider advancing your research training at St. Jude.

Here are our postdoctoral research training opportunities. Please click on the position title for more information, and apply from that page if you are interested.

 

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  Postdoctoral Research Associate-Cell Biology of Neural Development St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital   St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is a world-renowned institution that is recognized as one of the best places to work in the nation. As a premier center for research and treatment of childhood catastrophic diseases, we employ a diverse team of scientific and healthcare professionals dedicated to the promise of hope. Children from all 50 states and from around the world have come through the doors of St. Jude for treatment, and thousands more have benefited from our research. Description Neuronal polarity is an essential driving force that coordinates the choreography of neural development. How polarity signaling organizes the behavior of immature neurons, in addition to how polarity signaling cascades are regulated are the key topics studied by the Solecki laboratory. These questions are critical to understanding the pathology of neurodevelopmental diseases, where the production of neurons or their subsequent migration is defective.    Exciting postdoctoral positions are available immediately Solecki lab at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for talented and highly motivated individuals interested in understanding the cell biology of neuronal polarity or the regulation of nuclear architecture during neuronal differentiation. The Solecki Lab takes a multidisciplinary approach via cutting edge imaging technologies like lattice light sheet (LLS) microscopy or correlative super-resolution electron microscopy (CLEM) and computational approaches to mechanistically analyze the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling neuronal differentiation, migration, and polarization.   Contact To apply for this position, submit the online application, and send a C.V. and 3 letters of recommendation to: David J. Solecki, PhD, Department of Structural Biology, Mail Stop 311, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105, USA, david.solecki@stjude.org.
ID
42727
Department
Developmental Neurobiology
Faculty Member
David Solecki
POSTDOCTORAL POSITION to Study Mechanics of the Nuclear Envelope via Data-Driven Computational Modeling.   We are seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral fellow to join the group of Dr. Khaled Khairy. The lab is located in the Department of Developmental Neurobiology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. We combine continuum mechanics computational models of membrane-bound biological structures with state-of-the-art quantitative image analysis to gain insights into the basis for cell and organelle morphology, and to better understand mechanisms of shape change in normal and pathological cases (www.stjude.org/khairy).   Interested applicants should send their CV, a cover letter describing research experience and interests, and names and addresses of three references to:  khaled.khairy@stjude.org
ID
42653
Department
Developmental Neurobiology
Faculty Member
Khaled Khairy
The laboratory of Dr. Taosheng Chen studies the roles of nuclear xenobiotic receptors (PXR, CAR) and drug–metabolizing enzymes (CYP3A) in tumorigenesis and cancer drug resistance. We use multidisciplinary approaches to investigate signaling pathways, identify and validate targets, and develop chemical probes to interrogate the function of PXR, CAR and CYP3A in order to overcome drug resistance and tumorigenesis in cellular and animal models (Lin et al, Nat Commun. 8:741, 2017).
ID
42373
Department
Chemical Biology & Therapeutic
Faculty Member
Taosheng Chen
Postdoctoral positions are immediately available Mark Hatley’s laboratory in the Molecular Oncology Division of the Department of Oncology at St. Jude Children’s Hospital to study how normal development processes are perturbed to drive pediatric embryonal tumors using rhabdomyosarcoma as a model system. Our recent findings defined the cell of origin of rhabdomyosarcoma, a presumed skeletal muscle tumor, as an endothelial progenitor cell (Cancer Cell, 33:108-124, 2018). We now seek to elucidate the mechanism of this cell reprogramming event and its role in cell transformation. The lab leverages genetically engineered mouse models, patient-derived xenografts, human and mouse tumor and primary cell lines as well as induced pluripotent stem cells as model systems to interrogate the underlying pathobiology of pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma. The Hatley lab is a very collaborative, interactive environment focused on scientific and career development of trainees. Successful applicants should have strong organizational and communication skills with drive and dedication to participate as a member of our team.
ID
42330
Department
Oncology
Faculty Member
Mark Hatley
The DeRenzo laboratory is recruiting a postdoctoral researcher to study chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells for the treatment of pediatric patients with solid tumors.  The project will include pre-clinical development and testing of novel CAR T-cell therapies against pediatric solid tumors in vitro and in vivo.
ID
39917
Department
Bone Marrow Trans & Cell Therapy
Faculty Member
Christopher DeRenzo
The Chen Lab studies the transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptors and fusion oncoproteins by using chemical biology approaches, while members of the High Throughput Bioscience (HTB) Center (directed by Dr. Chen) work together on drug discovery technology development, therapeutic target discovery, assay development, laboratory automation, and high-throughput and high-content screenings.
ID
39875
Department
Chemical Biology & Therapeutic
Faculty Member
Taosheng Chen
The postdoctoral fellow will have expertise in biochemistry, molecular biology as well as experience with animal models.  The projects will utilize biochemistry, cell culture, cell biology and animal models of disease.  The goal will be used to understand how and where these proteins affect pathways in disease progression. 
ID
39791
Department
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Faculty Member
John Schuetz
A postdoctoral research associate position is immediately available in the lab of Dr. Brian Abraham in the Department of Computational Biology, https://www.stjude.org/abraham. The Abraham lab studies gene expression-regulation mechanisms in healthy and diseased mammalian cells.  We are recruiting computationally talented individuals or biologically talented individuals seeking to transition into computational/bioinformatics research.  We build analytical software pipelines to find answers to biological questions about gene regulation in big datasets, usually from applied sequencing experiments like ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, and Hi-ChIP.  Our interests center on enhancers and super-enhancers, how these regulatory elements establish gene expression programs in healthy cells, and how enhancers are altered, abused, and targetable in diseased cells.  Particular focus is on characterizing the core regulatory circuitry driving understudied human cancers, and on understanding how mutations in the non-coding DNA of tumor cells can drive their survival and proliferation through gene misregulation.   Ideal candidates would have experience building analysis pipelines in Unix using widely available genomic analysis toolkits (e.g. bedtools, samtools), fundamental understanding of gene expression mechanisms (e.g. transcription factors, enhancers, genome structure, and transcriptional condensates), and have experience building succinct, clear figure using R.   Relevant Papers:   Abraham BJ, Hnisz D, Weintraub AS, Kwiatkowski N, Li CH, Li Z, Weichert-Leahey N, Rahman S, Liu Y, Etchin J, Li B, Shen S, Lee TI, Zhang J, Look AT, Mansour MR, Young RA. Small genomic insertions form enhancers that misregulate oncogenes. Nat Commun. 2017 Feb 9;8:14385. doi: 10.1038/ncomms14385. PubMed PMID: 28181482; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5309821.   Hnisz D, Abraham BJ, Lee TI, Lau A, Saint-André V, Sigova AA, Hoke HA, Young RA. Super-enhancers in the control of cell identity and disease. Cell. 2013 Nov 7;155(4):934-47. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.053. Epub 2013 Oct 10. PubMed PMID: 24119843; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3841062.
ID
39572
Department
Computational Biology
Faculty Member
Brian Abraham
Immunology postdoctoral positions are available in the laboratory of Dr. Hongbo Chi in the Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (www.stjude.org/chi), to investigate cell metabolism of the immune system (immunometabolism) and its implications in cancer and other diseases. We are particularly interested in understanding the metabolic programs, signaling pathways, and systems-level regulatory networks in basic T cell and dendritic cell biology and antitumor immunity. We apply interdisciplinary strategies by integrating immunological and genetic approaches with cutting-edge systems immunology tools including single-cell transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, network reconstruction, and CRISPR screening. Please see the following articles published over the past five years for additional information: Nature Reviews Immunology 20:55 (2020); Nature 565:101 (2019); Nature 576:471 (2019); Immunity 51:1012 (2019); Nature 558:141 (2018); Immunity 49:899 (2018); Science Immunology aas9818 (2018); Nature 548:602 (2017); Immunity 46:488 (2017); Nature Immunology 17:277 (2016); Immunity 45:540 (2016); and Nature Immunology 16:178 (2015).   St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, ranked a best children's hospital for pediatric cancer, offers an exceptional research and training environment with state-of-the-art facilities, along with competitive salary and excellent benefits, to postdoctoral fellows.
ID
38521
Department
Immunology
Faculty Member
Hongbo Chi
An exciting career opportunity is available for a postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of Dr. Andrew Davidoff to explore novel gene therapy techniques in the treatment of solid tumors. The Davidoff lab seeks an inventive researcher to develop novel gene therapy vectors and test them in our translational models of neuroblastoma, glioblastoma, and liver cancers. The ideal candidate will have experience with models of solid tumors and/or AAV-based gene therapy vectors, to seek innovative cures for rare pediatric cancers.
ID
36613
Department
Surgery
Faculty Member
Andrew Davidoff

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